INDEX

INDEX

Monday, 7 May 2018

BEFORE THE MIDDLEWICH DIARY: SEDDON'S BROOKS LANE WORKS, 1969

HERE'S ONE FROM MAY 2011


Seddon's Salt Works in Brooks Lane, adapted from an Instamatic slide taken in 1969. A strikingly similar view formed the basis for the Middlewich Heritage Trust logo.

MIDDLEWICH HERITAGE TRUST BLOG


From Facebook, 7th May 2011:


It was a headline in the 'Middlewich Chronicle' in 1967 which inspired this series of slides. I well recall my Dad showing the front page to my Uncle Jim: CUT LUMP SALT WORKS TO CLOSE said the headline, over an article which told us all that the three remaining Seddons Works were to be closed down (Murgatroyd's had closed a year before, in 1966). It was decided then that, as big changes were on the way, they should be recorded. After considering the available options, my father and I bought  a Kodak Instamatic camera. These little cameras were all the rage at the time and, though far from the best you could buy, they were relatively cheap and very easy to use. They also gave very good results with Kodachrome film cartridges. We always thought the square picture format was a bit strange, particularly as the film in the cartridges was actually standard 35mm. This is one of our early efforts; Seddon's Salt Works in Brooks Lane in 1969, two years after closure.

INSTAMATIC MEMORIES...

The mainstay of the Middlewich Diary: The Kodak Instamatic circa 1967
The legendary Kodak Instamatic was the  camera used to take the vast majority of the colour slides which form the basis of the Middlewich Diary. The combination of an Instamatic and the superb but now sadly discontinued Kodachrome film made for great photos. Nothing compared to modern digital photography at its best, but remarkably good for its day and its price-range.

Facebook Feedback (7th May 2011):

Geraldine Williams They were good, but not too clever at indoor shots with the flash. I could show you some examples but am too ashamed of the quality!

Dave Roberts Ours used 'flashcubes', which were considered a wonderful innovation at the time. To slow the shutter down to compensate for low light you simply plugged in a used 'flashcube'.
Indoor flash shots were all right if you could keep your distance, but if you got too close your subject would end up looking like some kind of ghastly cadaver on the photo.

Geraldine Williams  Quite..!!!

1 comment:

  1. Anyone got any photos of Brooks lane when the houses were still across the road from Seddon's?

    ReplyDelete

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